All around me are unopened books, unread books and even more books!

I got more books. WHOOPS! I had my RADA audition today and there is a Waterstones about a minute down the road and I couldn’t resist. Oh, I have also booked Central (8th Jan) and Drama Centre (10th Feb). As I read these plays, hopefully at some pace, I will add to this post with brief reviews but until then it will be a boring list. Here is what I got in no particular order. I have also included some of the years they were published/first performed. I WILL GET BACK ON TOP OF THIS NOW AND GET MORE REVIEWS UP SOON.

Fanta Orange by Sally Woodcock (2011)- I started his play quite hopeful but I found at the end I wasn’t too happy. There were some interesting relationships and ideas in the story but I feel like they were not explored enough, maybe it was hat there was too much and it was impossible to explore them all. The issues brought up are complicated and to not give them the time they deserve belittles them. Saying all that the play isn’t bad and it is worth a read for the good parts but I just feel it should have been pushed a little deeper at points.

The Author by Tim Crouch (2009)- This play was bloody good! It took me a little while to warm up to it as it is a strange style of writing. It is a play about the writer of a play, the actors and an audience member and how it affected them all differently and the repercussions of the play on their individual lives. It was a very complicated play and to see it would be sensational if you have actors who are very subtle, even in the original production Tim Crouch played the role of the writer. The story and characters really took me on a journey and not going to lie, I loved it. I really want to read more plays by Tim Crouch.

Immaculate by Oliver Lansley (2005)- Charm gets you a long way in life and this play is charming. That is the best way I can describe it, this play is charming. I want to read more of Oliver Lansley’s work to see if all his work is this charming. That aside, I feel it is quite an average play, I have seen work from Les Enfants Terribles before and it was very different to this and it was much better. Maybe it is because I am just reading this? I dunno I just felt like this play had charm but little else.

The Libertine by Stephen Jeffreys- Out of Joint version (1994)

The Twits adapted by Enda Walsh (2015)- Oh the beautiful memories of childhood. I have always loved Roald Dahl, as a child I worshipped his books (except for a brief spell of Jacqueline Wilson) and now as an adultish creature I love his work for adults. I wasn’t sure what to expect but I really enjoyed this play, it was very Royal Court. I feel that to have seen this performed would have been a treat. It is such a visual play even just reading it the play was showing in my head I saw the colours, characters and heard their voices so distinctly. I recommend this whole heartedly.

Even Stillness Breathes Softly Against a Brick Wall by Brad Birch (2013)

Jerusalem by Jez Butterworth (2009)- As a Wiltshire resident I had to read this play. I found it to be entertaining but I think it is one you need to see. The words are superb but without the energy behind them it just isn’t right.

Making Noise Quietly by Robert Holman (1986)- I umm…um…this was mixed. This is made up of three short plays and I feel the first two were very good, I found them engaging and different. Reading the final one I feel lukewarm about it, nothing was exactly wrong with it but I just found it less interesting and more laborious to read.

Splendour by Abi Morgan (2000) 

Five Plays by Moliere (The Would-Be Gentleman, That Scoundrel Scapin, The Miser, Love’s The Best Doctor and Don Juan.)

Saint Joan by Bernard Shaw (1923) 

Mr Puntila and His Man Matti by Bertolt Brecht 

The Rover and Other Plays by Aphra Behn (The Feigned Courtesans, The Lucky Chance and The Emperor of the Moon.)

Three Comedies by Ben Jonson (Volpone, The Alchemist and Bartholomew Fair) 

 

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